Feeding the pregnant mare
Jan31

Feeding the pregnant mare

Visual Cage   For most species, the extent of foetal growth determines the length of the pregnancy. Small species such as the dog have a shorter pregnancy (58-67 days) than large animals such as an elephant (645 days). Pregnancy lasts for about 11 months in the horse but as with all biological events the exact timing varies. For most mares, foaling will occur within a 10 day period (335 to 345 days) but it can vary between 320...

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Getting away from it all
Jan30

Getting away from it all

By Kathy Carter Are you planning a riding holiday? Even though it may be something of a ‘busman’s holiday’ to a horse owner, equestrian vacations offer many benefits, from improving your riding skills and making new friends, to developing fitness and challenging your own boundaries. If you are planning a trip this year, remember my four top tips – 1.Be honest about your experience If you exaggerate your level of riding skills, you...

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Cleaning and Caring for Leather Saddles and Bridles
Jan26

Cleaning and Caring for Leather Saddles and Bridles

Question: My horse’s tack always seems to be filthy and greasy after it has been used. I am worried about over cleaning it and ruining the leather, have you got any tips on cleaning and maintaining tack? Answer: The Society of Master Saddlers replies: When maintaining a used bridle clean your bridle regularly according to how often it is used. It is much better to give it a quick clean every time it is used but, if you don’t...

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Classical Riding Series – Part 12
Jan24

Classical Riding Series – Part 12

Shortening and lengthening strides By Anne Wilson Shortening and lengthening a horse’s stride is a good exercise to intersperse, along with transitions, to help the horse to balance and to engage the hindquarters and to build up the weight carrying ability of the haunches. To begin with the lengthened strides do not have to equate to extension or even to a medium trot, but literally just lengthening compared to the normal stride. When...

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Chewy chops!
Jan23

Chewy chops!

Your horse or pony needs plenty of chew time to keep him happy and healthy. Dengie nutritionist Tracey Hammond, MSc (Dist), explains why. Horses were designed to eat fibre and spend 16 to 18 hours a day in their natural environment eating. When they have less turnout during the winter months, it’s really important to keep them chewing for as long as possible to support their behavioural and digestive health. Chewing and behaviour...

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